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3 June, 15:43

In their native habitat, a fungus that kills gypsy moths in the larva stage controls the population. But in the United States, attempts to control the population aren't 100% efficient. Given the current rate of growth and defoliation, do you think gypsy moths could destroy the ecosystem or contribute to the development of a new ecosystem in this region? Explain your reasoning.

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  1. 3 June, 16:32
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    It is likely that intensive farming reduced the natural habitat of this fungus, thereby increasing the population of gypsy moths.

    Explanation:

    The use of larger amounts of land for intensive farming may be an important problem because it reduces the natural habitat available to wild species (in this case a beneficial fungus).
  2. 3 June, 17:10
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    Plato

    Explanation:

    Yes. Gypsy moths are rapidly destroying trees, which are producers. Producers transform radiant energy from the Sun into chemical energy for the entire ecosystem. Over time, tree loss could cause the ecosystem to collapse. Fewer trees could also lead to the growth of other native plants because there is less competition for space and other resources. A change in foliage would directly affect the populations of native organisms in the region. This process may lead to a new ecosystem.
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