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4 June, 06:43

The specific gravity of an object is numerically the same as its density as measured in the metric system.

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  1. 4 June, 07:00
    0
    The correct answer is 'True'.

    Specific gravity is the ratio of the density of a substance to the density of water. It has no unit.

    Density of a substance is the ratio of its mass to its volume with unit as g/ml.

    The density of water is 1 g/ml. Therefore, the specific gravity of an object is numerically the same as its density.
  2. 4 June, 08:24
    0
    It's true

    Explanation:

    Density is defined as the division between the mass of an object and the volume occupied by that object. Its unit of measure in the International System is the kilogram per cubic meter (kg/m^3). Meanwhile, specific gravity is defined as the weight of an object divided over the weight of water at 4°C. The specific gravity is dimensionless and coincides numerically with the density.
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