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23 June, 07:22

Waltons's goal is to "confer on all mankind ... a passage near thre pole." Is this noble or overly ambitious? Support your response with evidence from the text.

Frankenstien, The letters and chapters

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  1. 23 June, 08:27
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    In Frankenstein (1818) by Mary Shelley, Robert Walton's goal to discover a faster route for shipping goods is overly ambitious.

    In the story, Victor warns him about the dangers of ambition and its power to led him to his own demise since he has also been a victim of ambition before.

    "Farewell, Walton! Seek happiness in tranquillity and avoid ambition, even if it be only the apparently innocent one of distinguishing yourself in science and discoveries. Yet why do I say this? I have myself been blasted in these hopes." (Frankenstein, Chapter 24 Part Three).

    Walton constantly refuses to give up on his desire to find another route and he is willing to put everything on the line to achieve his goal. This is what makes his desire overly ambitious, regardless of how noble the goal is.
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